Defining Psychotherapy

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Defining Psychotherapy

Defining Psychotherapy

According to the National Institute of Mental Health, more than a quarter of adults in America suffer from depression, anxiety, and other related mental illnesses each year. In today’s world, so many forms of therapy are available to us, and many who suffer from a mental illness may choose to seek out someone who can help them work through these deep-rooted issues. There are therapists that specialize in certain areas, which can be incredibly helpful for helping us feel safe and secure, to know that we are being taken care of by someone who is very knowledgeable. With a variety of methods available, psychotherapy is a common choice to help a person lead happier, healthier, and more productive lives.

Defining Psychotherapy

Psychotherapy is defined as “talk therapy” and is a process in which psychological problems are treated through communication and relationships factors between a person and a mental health care professional. Modern psychotherapy is timed and productive, with each session lasting approximately 40-50 minutes and occurring once a week. In psychotherapy, clients can fully trust in confidentiality with their therapist. Their therapist will listen to them and comprehend their problems, while helping the client uncover their deep-rooted issues.

In psychotherapy, the client typically knows little about the therapist, mainly because the therapist does not want to skew the client’s perception of her or him. The therapist also does not provide their own stance or opinion on topics presented by the client, because the nature of the session is client-focused and the therapist is there to direct the conversation in a healthy manner.

Psychotherapy can be used in conjunction with medication and other treatment methods. Oftentimes, the therapist will work with a primary care physician and other healthcare professionals to determine the best treatment plan for a given patient. A recent study conducted by the American Psychological Association (APA) found that while psychotherapy is very effective in helping individuals address their problems, the use of psychotherapy is decreasing and the use of medication is increasing. This does present an issue because more people are focusing on “numbing” or “altering” their emotions rather than working through them with a therapist or using the medication to help them work through their problems in psychotherapy.

Utilizing medication to help treat mental illness could certainly be an effective tool for some – but in most cases, a combination of medication and therapy are most beneficial because it allows the person to become more mentally and emotionally stable while working through their issues in a safe environment.

 

Residential treatment programs give you the time you need to focus on healing. Avalon Malibu is one of California’s only certified primary mental health treatment facility providing trusted programs with trusted results. For a confidential assessment and more information, call us today: 888-958-7511

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